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How the colours in your home can affect your mindset

The master bedroom of the Manhattan display home
Relaxing blue tones in the master bedroom of The Manhattan display home .

Have you heard of colour psychology?

If you haven’t, don’t worry, most of us are probably familiar with both those things independently, but had no idea they could be related.

Have you ever felt a certain way in a room and wondered why? Or perhaps you’ve wondered why fast food restaurants always seem to use red and yellow as their main colour palettes?

As it turns out, the use of colour has a much greater impact on our brain than most of us would think. Colours affect our physiology. They influence our pulse, anxiety levels, blood flow and arousal. Certain colours have even been found to increase metabolism and, unfortunately, eyestrain (as those of us pay extra for the blue-light filter in our glasses know all too well).

Of course, perception of colour is fairly subjective but there are some colour effects that seem to have a universal meaning.

So, let’s take a look at some of the strongest emotion-evoking colours out there.

  1. Red. Red is bright and warm and often evokes strong emotions of love, comfort and warmth. It is considered an intense (or angry colour) and creates feelings of excitement or intensity.
  2. Yellow. Often described as warm, inviting and cheery, yet people are more likely to lose their tempers in yellow rooms (babies even tend to cry more when surrounded by the colour).
  3. Blue. Blue evokes feelings of calm and serenity and many people report feeling that it helps them focus and improves productivity. Blue can help to lower your body temperature and pulse.
  4. Brown. A neutral colour, brown helps to evoke feelings of reliability, stability and strength. It also brings about feelings of warmth and even sophistication.
  5. White. White typically represents purity, cleanliness and innocence. However, in some cultures, it is representative of mourning. White can help give a sense of space or add highlights, often making rooms appear larger than they are.

But what does this all mean for your home? Your living room is probably the space where you spend the most time, so it makes sense to be mindful of the decor to ensure it keeps you feeling your best. But keep in mind the other areas you find yourself in often, like your bedroom and study, and try to incorporate them there as well.

Head down to your local paint supply store, grab some swatches and do your own research! We would recommend:

  • White, timeless and elegant. You can’t go wrong with this one!
  • A pop of yellow here and there (think a feature wall, window frame or just some pillows)
  • Deep, ocean blue. Cool and relaxing, it will help you feel like you’re one step closer to a holiday!
  • Clay brown to add warmth and a sense of cosiness.
  • Sky blue. Perfect if you want some colour (but nothing overwhelming).
  • Lilac purple. Acts similarly to blues and gives a sense of tranquility. It can help more lively colours and patterns pop.

A fresh coat of paint can give new life to a home – and who would’ve thought that it can benefit your mental health as well?

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Emma

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